Winter Multi-Species Fishing at the Upper Cooper River! (01/21/18, Haddonfield, NJ)

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The Extreme Philly Fishing Blog contains reports that are very time consuming, and yet it makes no profit whatsoever! All posts here are free and open to the public! To have the time to continue writing and working on this Blog, I heavily depend on other sources of income -- such as my YouTube Channel and my Patreon Page. Thus, please note that although everything is free here, donations are always welcome! And, of course, your love and support are always appreciated! 
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Folks -- Winter is finally coming to an end!!! Next week we have some good weather (40-55F)! I think it is time for us to catch up on this Blog as well. :)

Here is my fishing report for January 21st, 2018. The 2018 Statistical Fishing Chart was updated as well.

Time: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- 2 Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus)
- 5 Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius)
- 3 Golden Shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas)
- 4 Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)
- 4 Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)
- 1 Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides)
- 1 Bluegill X Pumpkinseed Hybrid (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus)

Video:

Below are the highlights for this fishing session:

My 5th outing of 2018: still-fishing the Upper Cooper River, below Driscoll Pond. Don't forget to watch it in HD quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it! More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos! 

Summary & Photos:

Every winter of every year, I tend to keep one of my fishing traditions alive: to go micro-fishing for some shiners at the Upper Cooper River in Haddonfield, NJ. The fact is: shiners are just so underappreciated in the fishing community nowadays! After all, they are sold in tackle shops as bait; thus, they have a "baitfish" reputation. But let me tell you something, my fellow friends...when it comes to their sizes, even a chunky Golden Shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas) can give you a nice bend on an ultra-light setup! Even better -- many Species of Shiners are very resilient when it comes to cold weather. Therefore, they will always be there for your bait -- even when other Species are not willing to bite. 

Taking that in consideration, I went to the Upper Cooper River with my ultra-light setup for some "shiner still-fishing" action. I arrived at my usual spot -- the bridge, under the Driscoll Pond, around 11:30 a.m.. I equipped my Daiwa Spinmatic Ultra-Light Rod with my Shimano Sedona 500FD and 4lbs KastKing Fluorokote Fluorocarbon line. For my rig, I tied a dropper-loop rig with a size #10 Mustad Hook and a Water Gremlin Dipsey Swivel sinker. My main choice of bait was small pieces of big red worms.

After my first cast, it didn't really take long for the first Species of the day to show up. And to top it off, it wasn't a Shiner:

First Species of the day: a Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus).  

Second cast in, I got my first Shiner Species of the day:

Second Species of the day: a Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius).

And I have to say, folks: I was delighted! Heh. Not only I was happy at the fact that my objective of the day was accomplished, but also because the Spottail Shiner is not easily found in the state of New Jersey. 

In Pennsylvania, this Species can be found pretty much in every little Creek here and there. That includes places like the Pennypack Creek, or the TTF Watershed (Tacony, Tookany, and Frankford Creeks). Even the Poquessing and Byberry Creeks have a healthy population of Spottail Shiner. New Jersey; however, is a whole different story! Per se, NJ already doesn't have a lot of "clear water creeks" in the southern portion of its state -- which by the way, is the prime habitat for this specific Species of fish. Thus, catching one of those in NJ waters is always an accomplishment for a micro-fishing angler!

Continuing my fishing session for the day, the following Species showed up soon after:

Not quite a Species, but a Hybrid: a Bluegill X Pumpkinseed (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus)

Third Species and second Species of Shiner of the day: a Golden Shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas).

Fourth Species of the day: a Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

Fifth Species of the day: a Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

The Golden Shiner were definitely putting a great fight on the ultra-light setup! And among the Bluegill that showed up, there were a few "jumbos" here and there. In quotes, since a jumbo panfish in the Upper Cooper River only ranges from 5-6 inches. :(

And to end the day, a neat little Bass decided to bite on the red worms as well:

Sixth and final Species of the day: a Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides).
 
For a winter fishing session, the Upper Cooper River did not disappoint! To be able to land six different Species of fish in open water, in the harsh month of January, that is quite an accomplishment for any PA/NJ multi-species angler. :D   

And therefore, I left the spot without any regrets. Another annual tradition was fulfilled. 

Hope you folks have been doing good recently! 

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights! ,

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing 

Winter Spillway Fishing at the Pine Run Creek! (01/19/18, New Britain, PA)

...And another cold front is coming up, folks! This weather has been quite crazy recently! :(

Here is my fishing report for January 19th, 2018. The 2018 Statistical Fishing Chart was updated as well.

Location: Pine Run Creek
Time: 10:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- 9 Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)
- 1 White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis)
- 1 Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus)
- 1 Bluegill X Pumpkinseed Hybrid (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus)

Video:

Below are the highlights for this fishing session:

My 4th outing of 2018: fishing a the Pine Run Creek spillway, below the Pine Run Reservoir. Don't forget to watch it in HD quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it! More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos! 

Summary & Photos: 

After my huge skunk at the Pennypack Creek (previous post), I decided to hit a winter spot that is known to produce different Species of fish: the Pine Run Creek. I had two main goals for the day: (1) to shoot a YouTube video focusing on the theme of "never giving up," and (2) to boost my confidence when it comes to Winter fishing. After all, nothing feels better than catching a fish (any type of fish) during the colder months of the year (30-40F water temperature).

I arrived at the fishing spot around 10 a.m. EST. It was rather cold out there, but thankfully, the Creek wasn't frozen over! I setup my ultra-light Daiwa Spinmatic Rod with a Shimano Sedona 500FD reel (old model), 4lbs test KastKing Fluorokote line, and just a small 3 mm, size #16 Kenders Outdoors ice fishing jig, under a Comal weighted float. For bait, I tipped the jig with very small pieces of big red worms. The primary fishing pattern of the day was the traditional suspended jigging technique.

The Pine Run Creek. Plenty of snow around the area, but thankfully, the Creek was clear of ice!

First, I tried for a little bit under the Covered Bridge portion of the Creek. Sadly, after thirty minutes or so, I still hadn't had a single bite. Better saying -- I had three snags at that spot, and no fish. Thus, without wasting anymore time, I immediately hopped to the most productive spot on the Creek: the spillway. 

The spillway at the Pine Run Creek.

Not even five minutes after I arrived, I landed my first fish and first Species of the day: the Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). And just as I had expected, the fish bit my jig very very softly! I mean...the float barely went down with the bite. Which is why I would like to emphasize: when jigging during the Winter months of the year, always make sure to go as finesse as possible. In other words, keep your jigging setup as light as you possibly can! 

First Species of the day: the Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). It barely bit the hook too!

After many Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) here and there, I finally got a very interesting bite on the slow pool area of the spillway! Instead of just "bobbing" a little bit, my float started to move to the left at a constant speed! Bites like that are usually a good indicator that a Crappie is about to come up. After setting up the hook and reeling in the fish, I ended up with a beautiful PA White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis)

Second Species of the day: the White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis). A very beautiful sample for my area!

For many folks around the country, catching a White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis) is no problem whatsoever. However, in the Philadelphia area (and surroundings), catching one of these from shore is quite a rarity! The reality is that there are plenty of Black Crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) around here, and not so many adult White Crappie. Even with a boat, there are only a few bodies of water around here with a limited population of these fellas. :)

The rest of the day was pretty much a sunfish type of the day! I ended up catching one more Species while bottom jigging the worm: the Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). And a beautiful Bluegill X Pumpkinseed Hybrid (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus) also came up as well.

Third and final Species of the day: the Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). It came right from under a rock and hit the jig!

Not quite a new Species, but a hybrid is still a beautiful fish! This one is a Bluegill X Pumpkinseed Hybrid (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus)

Summarizing...I ended up the day with three different Species of fish, and a hybrid to boost! For a Winter day in January, this fishing session was definitely extremely productive. Just as a reminder...it is always tough to fish during the colder months of the year. Chances of catching any Species of fish go down drastically. However, keep in mind, anglers: if you don't go outside and try it out, your chances of catching fish will always be zero. :)  

Hope you folks have been catching a lot recently! 

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights!

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing

Winter Fishing the Pennypack Creek (01/17/18, Northeast Philadelphia, PA)

Once again, some crazy warm weather is coming this weekend, folks!!!

Here is my fishing report for January 17th, 2018. The 2018 Statistical Fishing Chart was updated as well.

Location: Pennypack Creek
Time: 12:00-2:30 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- None

Video:

Below are the highlights for this fishing session:

My 3rd outing of 2018. Winter fishing in the Pennypack Creek! Don't forget to watch it in HD quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it. More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos!

Summary & Photos:

After watching the light snowstorm this morning, I was enticed to go out and spend some time outdoors! Since I didn't have much availability today (tutoring has been busy), I hopped on my local bus and stopped by the Pennypack Creek in Northeast Philadelphia for some "winter creek fishing."

I arrived at my favorite Old Bustleton Avenue spot around noon. Not too surprisingly, more than 90% of the Creek was clear of ice. Only a few stagnant pools had a thin layer of ice on top (less than an inch). The water was pretty clear and the current was pretty swift. Combining all those factors with the whiteness of the fresh snow, we had the perfect environment for a few shots. Heh.

Winter is here, folks!

Following the logic of winter fishing, I decided to choose the 4mm, #14 hook Kender's Outdoors ice fishing jig with small pieces of super-worm as my primary setup for the day. As anglers should be aware of, live bait is always the best choice during the colder months of the year. I paired the jig with 4lbs KastKing Fluorokote fishing line, a Shimano Sedona 500 FD fishing reel, and my trusted 5'6" Daiwa Spinmatic 2 pieces, Ultra-Light fishing rod. 

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EPF's tip of the day:
Why is live bait so effective during the winter months of the year?! Recall that fish are ectothermic organisms. Thus, they enter a state of torpor during the colder months of the year. The level of activity varies from Species to Species; however, it is a fact that all of them become more sluggish as water temperature drops. Therefore, they tend to nibble your bait instead of inhaling it aggressively. The livelier and more natural the bait, higher your chances of getting a strike!  
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The primary pattern of the day was to cast and retrieve the small jig in the current. The main target was the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Sadly, after ninety minutes of fishing on the Creek, I ended up getting the skunk...And I even tried the 1/24 oz. Johnson Min-O-Spin and the 2 1/2 inches Rebel Floater jerkbait. 

The sad part of this fishing trip was that I chose my fishing spots very carefully. In other words, they were the most productive spots in that entire section of the Creek. Thus, after the skunk today, I can only presume that the Pennypack Creek right now has very very few Trout in it! As a matter of fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the entire number of Trout in the entire Creek didn't pass two dozen in total!  

Skunk or not, I had a wonderful time outdoors. And this fishing session reminded me of how harsh this particular Creek can be during the colder months of the year. Heh.

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights!

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing

My First Fish of 2018 + Testing my New "Thunderfury" Ice Fishing Rod (01/11/18, Gloucester, NJ)

This Winter weather has been crazy, hasn't it, folks?!

Here is my fishing report for January 11th, 2018. The 2018 Statistical Fishing Chart was updated as well.

Location: Nameless Pond
Time: 10:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- 7 Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)
- 1 Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides)

Video:

Below are the highlights for this fishing session:


My 2nd outing of 2018: ice fishing a nameless pond in Gloucester, NJ. Don't forget to watch it in HD Quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it. More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos!

Summary & Photos:

Taking the upcoming warm weather in consideration (32F/0ºC to 45F/7ºC), my friend Jacob Korbel (a.k.a. Jacob Korbel Fishing) and I decided to hit a nameless little pond in Gloucester, NJ for one last attempt at ice fishing!  

According to Jacob, who had fished the Pond for the previous three days or so, the pond had a combination of Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, and Black Crappie. Thus, our hopes for catching any Species of fish were pretty high!

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EPF's tip of the day:
As every angler should be aware of, reconnaissance is a fundamental strategy and step when it comes to fishing. That is when knowing your local watersheds really pays off. Recall: knowing where the structure and deep areas are in a specific lake or pond is the key to success during the colder months of the year!
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We arrived at the spot around 10:00 a.m.. After checking the thickness of the ice around the edges of the pond, we were astonished to find out that even with the rise in temperatures, we still had 5-6 inches of solid ice! We dug a few holes with our Friday the 13th axe (old style) and got the jigging started!


Jacob stands on top of the little unnamed pond in Gloucester, NJ. Funny how even the smaller bodies of water by the roads can sometimes hold fish!

The primary objective of this fishing session was for me to catch my first fish of 2018. The secondary goal was to test my new Fiblink "Thunderfury" ML ice fishing rod. Therefore, instead of the traditional tip-up  and "still-fishing" approach, Jacob and I decided to use our rods for active jigging. I paired the rod with a Shimano Sedona 500 FD, which is -- as a matter of fact -- the lightest reel that I have in my arsenal. For line, I used the KastKing Fluorokote, 4lbs test; and for my jig, I used a 3 mm, size #16 hook Kenders Outdoors Ice Fishing jig.

I baited my jigs with half pieces of super-worm and jigged them 2-4 inches above the bottom, giving short stops in-between jigs. I favored locations with dying vegetation on the bottom. Five minutes into the fishing session, I landed my first Species and first fish of this year:


A Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). The "purplish" hue is an indicator of low water temperatures. 

And after a few more Bluegill here and there, I ended up landing my second Species of the day: 
    
A Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides). The red in their upper lips is a common indicator of low water temperatures.

My friend Jacob didn't fall short either. After jigging multiple holes, he finally found a productive one. He landed this nice fella after an intense fight on 2lbs test line (hehe):


Jacob with his biggest fish of the day.

In the end, even though the pond was rumored to have a few fish in the range of 4-5lbs, Jacob and I weren't really able to land any fish bigger than a mere pound. After jigging in many different holes, we were also unable to catch any Black Crappie. Taking all the negatives aside, I did accomplish my main quests for the day...and, of course, I had a wonderful day outdoors with a friend who I didn't see for quite a while!    

Fishing sessions like these always remind me of how the most trivial things in life can make us happy. Remember, folks...sometimes it is not so much about the size of the fish that you catch, or its rarity. Sometimes, it is just about enjoying the outdoors and having a good time doing the things that you love to do. :)

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights!

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing

My First Skunk of 2018!!! (01/08/18, Clinton, NJ)

I hope you folks all had a wonderful holiday season! 

Here is my fishing report for January 8th, 2018. The 2018 Statistical Fishing Chart was updated as well. 

Location: Spruce Run 
Time: 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- None 

Video:

Below are the highlights for this fishing session:

My 1st outing of 2018. Multi-Species fishing at the Spruce Run Reservoir in Clinton, NJ. Don't forget to watch it in HD quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it. More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos!  

Summary & Photos:

Despite having a lingering cough for almost five weeks, I finally decided to go out with my friends for some ice fishing in north New Jersey! Thus, my friends David Ho (a.k.a. Symplex Fishing), Zach Merchant (a.k.a. Zach Merchant Fishing), Jimmy Ly (a.k.a. RaWr Fishing), and I decided to hop on the Spruce Run Reservoir for some Multi-Species ice fishing.

Upon arrival, I was quite shocked to see that we had 8-12 inches of ice on the Reservoir!!! Compared to the previous years in Philadelphia and surroundings, that was definitely the thickest ice that I had seen in a while.

Almost half way through with the auger, and the ice was already in the range of 4 inches

We ended up setting fourteen tip-ups among the four of us. All of them were baited with small to medium sized live shiners, on small 2-4 Gamakatsu hooks, with a small split-shot 6-10 inches above it. We were fishing from 6 inches to 2 feet off the bottom.

Considering the fact that we were going for quality over quantity, we expected the day to be quite rough! And our expectations were right on the money. Heh. After six hours of fishing, only one Northern Pike (Esox lucius) was landed. It was a small 25 incher that Zach landed on the farthest tip up on the Reservoir!

Zach Merchant from Zach Merchant Fishing with a "small" Northern Pike. Photo Credit: RaWr Fishing

Other than that, Symplex Fishing and I tried jigging a few holes with our new ice fishing rods: the Fiblink Graphite Ice Fishing Rod, ML. We paired it up with small 500 model reels, 4-6lbs KastKing Fluotokote line, and 4 mm Kender Outdoors ice fishing tungsten jigs. We used a combination of superworms and nightcrawlers, but to avail. In the end, we weren't able to find the fish in that huge Reservoir.

So there you have it, folks...the first skunk of 2018! One of many to come, of course. But the bottom line is -- even with the brutal weather and the lack of fish, wonderful memories were still created that day! Let's be frank here: nothing beats a good day on the water with your fishing buddies, right? Heh.

From left to right, RaWr Fishing, Symplex Fish, Extreme Philly Fishing, & Zach Merchant Fishing

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights! 

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing

This will be my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2018. Let's attempt to complete it this year (Haha)! Every catch that I perform will be registered in terms of number, photo and Species. This will help me create a little "fishing diary" and keep scores and data along the year. This post will be updated regularly (hopefully).

Before you read any further, here are a couple notes that you will want to take in consideration:

-- All fishes in this post were identified by Extreme Philly Fishing with the help of many primary sources and peer reviews. Primary sources include fish identification guides (i.e. Peterson, North America Freshwater Species, etc.) and peers include experts in the field of Multi-Species angling, all with a list of 200+ species under their name.

If you want specific data on a certain Species, location, bait, or time of the catch, shoot me an e-mail: sheng12182527@gmail.com. If you believe that there are inconsistencies in this post, shoot me an e-mail as well. :)

Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2017 (super imcomplete)
Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2016 (nonexistent).
Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2015 (incomplete).
Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2014.
Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2013.
Click here for my Statistical Fishing Chart for 2012.
P.s. for a more complete set of data, nowadays I use my SMUGMUG Fish Photo Database. You can access the photo database here

Last update/fishing session: 01/21/18

Days fished this year: 5
Maximum number of fish caught in a day: 20 (Upper Cooper River, Haddonfield, NJ - 01/21/18) 
Number of different species caught this year: 7
Number of NEW species caught this year: 0
TOTAL # of Fish caught in 2018: 40 (as for 01/21/18)
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Legend:

# = Number of fish of certain Species caught in 2018
Location caught = Where the portrayed fish of certain Species was caught (usually the biggest or most unusual of the year)
Date = When the portrayed fish of certain Species was caught

Format:

"-- Name (Species) -- #
Location caught - Date caught
Photo"

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-- Bluegill (Lepomis Macrochirus) -- 20
Upper Cooper River, Haddonfield (NJ) 01/21/2018


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-- Golden Shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas) -- 3
Upper Cooper River, Haddonfield (NJ) 01/21/2018


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-- Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) -- 1
Pine Run Creek, New Britain (PA) 01/19/2018


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-- Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) -- 2
Nameless Pond, Gloucester (NJ) 01/11/2018


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-- Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius) -- 5
Upper Cooper River, Haddonfield (NJ) 01/21/2018


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-- White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis) -- 1
Pine Run Creek, New Britain (PA) 01/19/2018


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-- Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) -- 4
Upper Cooper River, Haddonfield (NJ) 01/21/2018


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-- Other Fishes (---) -- 2
--- (--) --/--/2018

Bluegill X Pumpkinseed Hybrid (L. macrochirus X L. gibbosus)

The Fall Trout Season in PA Finally Arrived!!! (10/10/17, Northeast Philadelphia, PA)

What's up, Blog Readers?! 

It has been quite a while since I have worked on the Blog, right?! To be more precise, about half a year! And boy...so many things have happened in six months, if you think about it. We are now above 100,000 subscribers on the YouTube Channel, and 25,000 followers on Instagram! SnapChat has been doing pretty well too, with an average of 3,000 views per snap. Folks have been helping out on Patreon as well (45 Patreonites+ thank you all for your support), and finally, although inactive, the Blog has reached more than 700,000 views, with an average of 400 views per day! :)

Thus, before getting to the post for today, I would like to dedicate this paragraph to all you folks who support Extreme Philly Fishing on social media: thank you so much for watching, reading, and following EPF!!! I may have not been working on this Blog, but you folks know that it has been busy and hectic. Heh. 

Anyways...here is my fishing report for October 10th, 11th, and 12th of 2017: fishing the Philadelphia County's Fall Rainbow Trout season at the Pennypack Creek.

Location: Pennypack Creek
Time: 3:00-6:00 p.m.; 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.; 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Fishes caught:

- 7 Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
- 3 Redbreast Sunfish (Lepomis auritus)

Video:

Below are the highlights for these fishing sessions:

My 128th and 129th outing of 2017. Fishing for stocked Rainbow Trout at the Pennypack Creek using Berkley Power Bait. Don't forget to watch it in HD Quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it. More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos! 

  
My 130th outing of 2017. Fishing for stocked Rainbow Trout at the Pennypack Creek using the Johnson Min-O-Spin in-line spinner. Don't forget to watch it in HD Quality (1080p60)! If you enjoy watching my YouTube videos, please support the YouTube Channel by subscribing to it. More likes & more subscribes = more time to make videos! 

Summary & Photos:

The 2017 "Fall Trout Opening" day in Philadelphia County was really no different than all previous years'! First and foremost, the amount of Rainbow Trout that was stocked in the Bustleton Avenue portion of the Creek was laughable compared to the Spring season's numbers. And although I wasn't there to see it, I did hear from locals that they stocked only "a few buckets of fish" in each spot around the Creek. Taking in consideration that each bucket usually contains 30-50 fish, it is plausible to say that only 200-300 Trout were stocked around there. 

On the first day of the Fall Trout season, I arrived between the Bustleton Avenue/Roosevelt Boulevard portion of the Creek around 3 p.m. EST. The first thing that I did was ask the local fishermen about the stocking, and soon I found out that they had stocked the Creek "less than a hour ago." 

Taking in consideration that those Trout need quite some time to adapt to the Creek before feeding, I immediately concluded that my best choice for catching them at the time was to use some Berkley Power Bait

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SIDENOTE
There are many different colors and flavors of Berkley Power Bait in the market nowadays, but my favorite one is definitely the yellow one. No glitter, and no additional scent. Thus, that is the one that I recommend you folks! Note that this decision comes from years of playing and experimenting with the stocked Trout (both Brown and Rainbow Trout). Heh.
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I rigged my Daiwa Spinmatic, 5' 6", Ultra-Light rod and my Shimano Sedona 500 FD reel (old model) with 4lbs KastKing Fluorokote fluorocarbon line, 3 small Water Gremlin split-shots (I call them the Wal-Mart special) and a size #12 Mustad hook. I put on just enough Power Bait to cover the hook! The primary technique for the day was sit and wait; thus, still-fishing for the Trout. 

It took me a good thirty-minutes for my first bite. Sadly, I missed the fish because I didn't give it enough time to swallow the bait. Ugh! Well...As someone wise once said: "Impatience is the root of all injuries." And raise thy hands the first angler who never gave a premature hook set, right? Heh. We all get excited from time to time.

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SIDENOTE
As portrayed in the YouTube video above, the Berkley Power Bait is a type of dough bait that stocked Trout tend to swallow! Since the Oncorhynchus, Salmo, and Salvelinus genera of fish are very sensitive and have a high mortality rate when it comes to human handling, I don't recommend anglers who practice Catch & Release to use it on stocked Trout. If one must really use it, just make sure to:
(1) wet your hands when handling the hooked fish
(2) unhook the fish in the water
(3) clip the line as close to its mouth as possible
To avoid internal bleeding and minimize mortality ratio, C&R anglers should definitely not place the gut hooked fish outside of the water, or try to recover the hook!!!
Another alternative is to use Power Eggs and be very quick on the hook set. 
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After a few missed bites, I finally gave a stubborn Rainbow Trout enough time to chew on the bait! After setting the hook, I felt its solid weight on the other side of my line. And, as it turned out, it was a beauty indeed:

My first stocked Raibow Trout of the Fall season of 2017! 

Sadly, for the remaining of the first day, that was the only fish that I was able to land. Most of the stocked Trout were still in an adaptation stage. 

And so the first day ended.

The second day was much easier compared to the first. That is because most (if not all) of the stocked Rainbow Trout were already adapted to their surroundings -- to the Pennypack Creek. Therefore, instead of using a still-fishing approach with the Berkley Power Bait, I decided to use the wait-and-jig technique for it.

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SIDENOTE
The wait-and-jig technique is fairly simple and very effective, and yet a lot of anglers underestimate it. The technique itself consists of casting the bait in the water, and moving it every 30 seconds or so. Thus, its name: wait and jig. It is usually during one of those pauses that the bait is positioned directly or close to a feeding fish, inciting it to bite! Summarizing...the Trout bite usually comes really fast just after the pause. The con of this technique is the amount of snags that the angler will get, of course.
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Differently than the previous day, it took me only a measly forty-five minutes to get my limit of three fish for the Fall season

My limit of three Trout for October 11th, 2017. The one on top was definitely a chunky one!

Finally, for the following day -- the third day in the season -- I decided to switch from a dough bait wait-and-jig approach to a more aggressive steady-retrieve approach, with in-line spinners. To make my YouTube video a little bit more entertaining, I decided to use some of the lures that one of my subscribers sent me:

From left to right: three different patterns of the 1/8 oz. Johnson Min-O-Spin, and two different patterns of the 1/8 oz. Thomas Lures E.P. Series in-line spinner. And yes -- this photo was taken on a Septa Bus. LOL.
   
The premise of the video was to show my fellow anglers and viewers that (1) when the fish fully adapt to their new environment (a.k.a. the Creek), they are forced to drop their hatchery feeding behavior and pick up different natural food sources for their own survival; and (2) in a period of 48 hours after the stocking, most of the sample population had already adapted to the Creek.  

After a few casts here and there, more victims started to show up on the Johnson Min-O-Spin

One of the many Trout that fell victim to my Subscriber's Johnson.

Let's just say that it didn't really take me a long time to catch my limit on those lures. 

And this pretty concludes my post for today, folks! 

Those were definitely three very interesting fishing sessions for stocked Trout, and shooting those YouTube videos was definitely a lot of fun. :) Of course catching the Trout and eating them was equally fun. Hehe.

For those who have never tried this type of fishery before -- I truly recommend. After all, with all the heavy metals and PCBs that we have in our local fishes nowadays (different Species), it is never a bad idea to eat some "farm raised" samples here and there. Plus, the stocked Trout tradition in the United States of America is a great way to get kids initiated in the sport! Think about it! 

I hope you folks enjoyed the knowledge and the read! Make sure you watch the YouTube videos to complete the experience. 

Best of luck to all of us,

Long Days and Pleasant Nights!

Sincerely,

Leo S. a.k.a. Extreme Philly Fishing